Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12544/676
A re-examination of the mechanism and human impact of catastrophic mass flows originating on Nevado Huascarán, Cordillera Blanca, Peru in 1962 and 1970
Sep-2009
Engineering Geology, v. 108, n. 1–2, 2009
The 1962 and 1970 Huascarán mass movements, originated as rock/ice falls from the mountain's North Peak, transformed into higher-volume high-velocity mud-rich debris flows by incorporation of snow from the surface of a glacier below Huascarán and the substantial entrainment of morainic and colluvial material from slopes below the glacier terminus. Water for fluidization of the entrained material originated in the melting of incorporated snow and the liberation of soil moisture contained within the entrained materials. Eyewitness reports indicate very high mean velocities for the events; 17–35 m/s (1962) and 50–85 m/s (1970). The runout distances and velocity profiles of both events were simulated using DAN/W. Both mass movements continued downstream in the Rio Santa as debris floods (aluviones) that in 1970 reached the Pacific at a distance of 180 km. In strong contrast to publications in the geosciences literature, 1961 Peru Census data indicates that the death toll of the 1970 event is ca. 6000 and that total life loss in the two events did not exceed 7000 people.
Elsevier
Evans, S. G.; Bishop, N. F.; Fídel Smoll, L.; Valderrama, P.; Delaney, K. B. & Oliver-Smith, A. (2009) - A re-examination of the mechanism and human impact of catastrophic mass flows originating on Nevado Huascarán, Cordillera Blanca, Peru in 1962 and 1970. Engineering Geology, 108(1–2): 96–118. Doi: 10.1016/j.enggeo.2009.06.020
pp. 96-118
10.1016/j.enggeo.2009.06.020

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